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Man choked wife but walks free as behaviour put down to '1970s' views

by Minna Trejo (2020-03-17)


A judge has told a husband who throttled his new wife and bullied her for the way she drove their car that his behaviour was due to 1970s-style 'outdated' views he held of women as he was spared jail today and walked free from court.

Graham Walker, 63, choked and slapped his traumatised spouse Deborah after the pair rowed about the best way back to their Manchester hotel room. 

The father-of-four screamed at Deborah, with whom he was celebrating his first wedding anniversary, grabbed her by the throat, and struck her. 

He had been previously controlling and coercive, banning her from seeing friends or relatives, and berated her over her weight and the way she walked.






Graham Walker (pictured) throttled his wife Deborah on the night of their first wedding anniversary, after bickering about the best way back to their Manchester hotel room 


Walker was not even unknown to have mocked the way Deborah drove their car. For those who have any queries concerning wherever as well as the best way to work with it’s important to remember that you only get one chance to properly heal and recover. It’s unfortunate (Medium.com), you'll be able to contact us in our own web site.   

At Manchester Crown Court, however, a judge sentenced Walker, of Reddish, near Stockport, to an 18-month community order. 

Walker, who had pleaded guilty to engaging in controlling and coercive behaviour and common assault, was ordered to complete a Building Better Relationships programme after the court heard he held 'old-fashioned' views of women.

Judge Mary Loram, sentencing, told Walker that his behaviour was 'borne not just out of outdated views but also out of insecurity'.

She ruled that the relationship, which has since ended, was 'not typified by violence, apart from one assault', but was 'often unpleasant' and 'unhealthy'.  

The judge told the bully that he was 'paranoid and jealous' and had made Deborah's 'life a misery' by undermining and isolating her from loved ones.






Judge Mary Loram, sentencing, told Walker that his behaviour was 'borne not just out of outdated views but also out of insecurity' (stock image)


She added: 'This is a real chance for you to change. Don't use your age to excuse your behaviour, you were a young man in the 1970s, come on!'